The Daily Dog

Daily news about your best friend

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B.C.-bound dog lost by Air Canada staff dies after being hit by a car

VANCOUVER _ An American woman who was attempting to relocate an Italian greyhound to a family in British Columbia, only to learn the dog was missing after it bolted from Air Canada employees at San Francisco’s airport, says she’s confirmed the animal died after apparently being hit by a car.

The case of Larry the greyhound caused a PR nightmare for Air Canada, first because of the nature of the missing cargo and then after a company official inadvertently sent a dismissive email about the subject to an American television station.

The dog ran away from its handlers at San Francisco International Airport on Oct. 7. Air Canada has said workers took the dog out of its crate during a flight delay, but the animal fled after either slipping out of its collar or breaking it.

Read more: B.C.-bound dog lost by Air Canada staff dies after being hit by a car.

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Video: Dog shelter sleuths seek to reunite dogs with their owners

Beth Smith walked by the dachshund once, then twice.

The dog was injured; it could barely move its hind legs. And its muzzle and face bore superficial cuts, as though it had tangled with a cactus or perhaps another dog.

Many of the strays brought into Maricopa County Animal Care and Control have such marks from their time on the street. But Smith, an animal-care technician at the shelter, was noticing other things, too.

The dachshund’s unusual coloring caught her eye; she knew the dappled look was prized among admirers of the breed. And there was something else. Despite the little dog’s obvious pain and bedraggled face, its eyes were bright.

This dog had a home, Smith knew. And she needed to find it. Read More

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F.D.A. Bids to Regulate Animal Food, Acting After Recall and Deaths

The Food and Drug Administration proposed rules on Friday that would govern the production of pet food and farm animal feed for the first time.

The regulation would help prevent food-borne illness in both animals and people, officials at the agency said, as people can become sick from handling contaminated animal food and from touching pets that have eaten it.

The proposal comes six years after the biggest pet food recall in history, when a Chinese producer contaminated dog and cat food with melamine, a compound used in plastics, causing the deaths of animals across the United States.

Read more: F.D.A. Bids to Regulate Animal Food, Acting After Recall and Deaths – NYTimes.com.