The Daily Dog

Daily news about your best friend

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Do dogs get jealous?

It is commonly assumed that jealousy is unique to humans, partially because of the complex cognitions often involved in this emotion. However, from a functional perspective, one might expect that an emotion that evolved to protect social bonds from interlopers might exist in other social species, particularly one as cognitively sophisticated as the dog. The current experiment adapted a paradigm from human infant studies to examine jealousy in domestic dogs. We found that dogs exhibited significantly more jealous behaviors e.g., snapping, getting between the owner and object, pushing/touching the object/owner when their owners displayed affectionate behaviors towards what appeared to be another dog as compared to nonsocial objects. These results lend support to the hypothesis that jealousy has some “primordial” form that exists in human infants and in at least one other social species besides humans.

Read more: PLOS ONE: Jealousy in Dogs.

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Pit Bull Lovers Gather In Washington To Show That Dogs ‘Are Born Inherently Good’

Pit bull lovers gathered at the U.S. Capitol on Saturday for a demonstration against “breed-specific legislation” — laws that ban or otherwise restrict ownership of dogs by breed, most often aimed at pit bulls.

“Thank you for coming today,” shouted comedian Rebecca Corry, who organized the Million Pibble March — “pibble” being the affectionate name for pitties — on behalf of her dog Angel, who’d been severely abused by a previous owner.

“Today we are sending the message to legislators on the federal, state and local levels that killing and banning the victim is not and never will be OK, or the answer,” said Corry. “People trying to put an end to pit bull terriers live at a low level and need rescuing, too. Sadly, trying to reason with dumb is like asking a person with no arms to give you a hug.”

Read more: Pit Bull Lovers Gather In Washington To Show That Dogs ‘Are Born Inherently Good’.

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Video: Dogs pick up directions from human voices

When every call of “Spot, come!” sends your dog running in the opposite direction, it’s easy to be cynical about how well canines listen. But a new study shows dogs and even puppies are capable of understanding subtle and indirect cues in human voices, a finding with implications for how dogs came to be deeply attuned to human behavior.

The study found that dogs of all shapes and sizes could home in on a treat based entirely on the direction in which a hidden human was speaking. Human babies can do the same, but our clever cousins the chimpanzees can’t, according to a 2012 study.

Read more: Dogs pick up directions from human voices.

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▶ Funny Dogs Playing Fetch By Themselves Compilation

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My dog’s butt looks like Jesus!

Well, it had to happen eventually, didn’t it?

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Storm family, dog reunite 18 months later

CNN — When Chuck and Elicia James ventured to their local animal shelter to adopt a dog, they expected to meet a new member of their family. Instead they found themselves reunited with their long lost canine.

The James’ had not seen Reckless, a brown and white terrier-pitbull mix, since he went missing over a year and a half ago during Superstorm Sandy. They had lost their beloved pup after the fence in their Keansburg, New Jersey, home was mangled during the storm, Chuck James told CNN on Friday.

Apps go to the dogsFamily finds dog amid landslide rubbleCancer patient reunites with lost dogWhile the family never stopped looking for Reckless, for their 10-year-old daughter’s birthday they decided it was time to move on and adopt a new dog at the Monmouth County SPCA.

Read more: Storm family, dog reunite 18 months later – CNN.com.

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Dog Feats Reach New Heights

Not to brag, but we may have a little genius on our hands. Our 6-month-old is up before dawn playing brain games. She knows her way around an iPad and practically devours puzzles, and I’m teaching her to read. Just recently, she mastered an advanced chess toy.

I am talking, of course, about our dog.

Read more: Dog Feats Reach New Heights – NYTimes.com.

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Pittsburgh police dog Rocco remembered as a hero

Officer Phil Lerza sobbed.

He exited the glass double doors and walked away from the building.

Inside, his fellow Pittsburgh police officers lined the hallways of the veterinary office, some in their uniforms, others sporting green canine unit sweatshirts, as he was.

They had just lost one of their own — and Officer Lerza had lost his partner.

Canine Rocco died at 6:17 p.m. Thursday at the Pittsburgh Veterinary Specialty & Emergency Center in Ohio Township “after a good fight,” Zone 2 Cmdr. Eric Holmes said. The 8-year-old German shepherd was stabbed Tuesday night while apprehending a suspect.

Read more: Pittsburgh police dog Rocco remembered as a hero – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

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Pittsburgh police dog Rocco shows improvement after stabbing

A Pittsburgh police dog stabbed earlier this week is resting and showing signs of improvement this morning, a police spokeswoman said.Rocco, an 8-year-old German Shepard, remains in critical condition but is stable and his blood count is improving, spokeswoman Diane Richard said in a press release.The dog was injured Tuesday night while helping Pittsburgh police capture a fugitive, 21-year-old John Rush of Stowe, who police said was found lurking in the basement of a building in the 3700 block of Butler Street in Lawrenceville.

Police said Mr. Rush — also accused of resisting Allegheny County sheriff’s deputies’ attempts to arrest him earlier that night on numerous warrants — swung “wildly” at officers with a pocket knife and stabbed the dog and an officer, and injured two others officers in the scuffle.Rocco had two surgeries and multiple blood transfusions Wednesday.

Read more: Pittsburgh police dog Rocco shows improvement after stabbing – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

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Family finds missing dog 14 months later

When their mixed-breed dog Kanga escaped from a kennel in November 2012, about ten miles from their home, the Koprowski family spent months searching for her.

The northwest-side family searched neighborhoods, checked in with local kennels and scoured lost-dog postings on Craigslist. All to no avail.

"She had to go through the winter of 2012, she had to go through the summer, which was really hot, monsoons, rattlesnakes, so we weren’t very hopeful," Nancy Koprowski said about Kanga.

They hoped for the best, that a kind family had taken her in, but knew that after being lost in the desert for so long the odds were against her.

But it wouldn’t be the first time Kanga beat the odds.

Read more: Family finds missing dog 14 months later.